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«Vermont Technical College Catalog 2009-2010 Bachelor of Science Architectural Engineering Technology Business Technology and Management Computer ...»

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RSP 2602 RSP 2801/2802 Respiratory Internship/Internship Review (0/1)summer/spring The summer field experience is two days a week and allows students to practice in clinical areas in which they have received instruction. Students explore non-traditional roles for respiratory therapists, volunteer their time in a selected area of practice outside of the traditional hospital practice, and summarize their experiences in written and oral reports. Students create a case study presentation while applying evidencebased medicine guidelines; 16 clinical hours per week for thirteen weeks and 32 volunteer hours; graded Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: Permission for summer, RSP 2801 for fall Sustainable Design (SDT) SDT 1550 Erosion Prevention and Sediment Control (3) as required This course will focus on storm water runoff during the construction phase of a project and will present the various methodologies employed to control this potential pollution source. Coursework will provide a basic understanding of soils and how they behave when exposed during construction; 2 hours of lecture with occasional laboratory demonstrations. Prerequisite: MAT1221 or placement level 3 or equivalent or instructor permission Course Descriptions SDT 2550 Storm Water Modeling and Permitting (3) as required This course will focus on Vermont storm water permitting and modeling of storm water systems using HydroCAD; 2 hours of lecture, 2 hours of laboratory/studio per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 3000 Sustainable Design and Technology Seminar (1) fall This course brings together the diverse group of students who enter the SDT program and introduces them to the concept and ethos of sustainability. Readings, films, and other media will be used and outside speakers will be invited. Students will explore their own particular interests in sustainability and present their findings to the class. Internship opportunities will be discussed; 1 hour of seminar per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 3010 Conflict and Communication (3) spring This course introduces students to the basic causes and nature of human conflict. Students will use case studies and role playing to explore the nature of working in groups, the types of conflict that occur, and very basic techniques that can be used to discuss, explore, and sometimes resolve conflict; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 3020 Environmental Permitting (2) spring This course introduces student to the federal, state, and local permitting process. Issues include an introduction to the legal foundation of the permitting process and a historic prospective on environmental permits. Typical topics include the Clean Water and the Clean Air Acts, the Vermont 2000 Farm Bill, Act 250 hearings, and planning and zoning boards. Students will be required to attend permit hearings outside of regular class hours; 1 hour of lecture, 3 hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 3110 Codes & Loads & LEED (3) fall This course provides students with an understanding of the codes and specifications that govern the determination of designing structural, heating/cooling, and lighting/electrical loads for buildings, as well as an introduction to the LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) rating system. It introduces students to the determination of applicable code provisions, the application of those code provisions, and also to methods for calculating and estimating loads that are not specifically addressed or are insufficiently addressed in code books, manuals, and elsewhere (e.g., special studies, rules of thumb, past experience, expert elicitation). The course provides the basic knowledge and skills for the determination and use of such loads in courses such as HVAC, Electrical/Lighting, Controls & Commissioning, and Studios. Lectures introduce topics and methods of application, the laboratory emphasizes the application of codes and methods on varying structure types; 2 hours of lecture, 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 3111 Energy Systems and Sustainability (3) fall This survey course introduces all SDT students to the technical issues related to the application of renewable energy systems for power and heat generation. The systems will be studied in terms of current and potential production capacity; resources and distribution issues; technology installation; and life-cycle costs. Specific technical topics will include small and large scale power grids and power transmission; fuels; electrical energy storage; combustion systems (diesel and hydrogen); fuel cells; solar and geothermal systems;

photovoltaic systems; wind and hydropower; hybrid systems; and combined heat and power; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CIS 1050 and MAT 1111 or equivalent.

SDT 3121 Sustainable Design Studio I (3) spring Through short team projects, all SDT students will begin to solve interdisciplinary problems in sustainable design, applying basic concepts learned in the sustainable survey courses and the technical courses in each discipline. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams on projects that draw from each discipline. Student teams will participate in a stepped process involving problem evaluation, design alternatives, calculations, graphic representation, and presentation to the class and a professional panel; 6 hours of studio per week.

Prerequisite: SDT 3010, concurrent enrollment in SDT 3111 Course Descriptions SDT 3130 Environmental Soils (3) fall This course will give students an introduction to soils using lecture and labs to gain hands-on experience.





Topics include the mechanical classification of soils; the identification of the seasonal high water table;

an overview of wetlands classification and applicable regulations; and an overview of issues of soils and agriculture; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MAT 1210 or placement level 2 SDT 4010 Water and Wastewater (3) fall This course introduces student to water quality issues and water and wastewater treatment for centralized and decentralized systems. Students will gain a broad overview of the treatment of water and wastewater including the permitting and regulatory requirement; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Junior standing in the SDT program SDT 4020 Ground Water and Storm Water (3) spring This course introduces student to ground water, storm water, and erosion control including the permitting and regulatory requirements; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Junior standing in SDT program SDT 4030 Renewable Energy Systems (3) spring This course introduces students to renewable energy systems including resource assessment, system design, installation, and performance monitoring. Laboratory activities include work with solar thermal, wind, solar PV, and other technologies. Topics covered include resource assessment and site selection;

installation practices and requirements; monitoring and performance analysis; maintenance; and life-cycle analysis. Visits to renewable energy facilities in the region may be included; 2 hours of lecture, 3 of hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARC 3050 or MEC 2010 and 2050, ELT 2072, 1032, or 1080 SDT 4110 Building Controls/Commissioning (3) spring This course in the Green Buildings technical core looks at two important areas for sustainable commercial buildings: integrated control systems and the hands-on ‘fine tuning’ that is essential for a building to operate efficiently. The first part of the course will concentrate on an overview of digital control systems (electrical circuits and basic system design). The second part of the course focuses on the detailed knowledge needed for the emerging field of building commissioning, now a requirement of the LEED certification process;

2 hours of lecture, 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ARC 3010 and SDT 3110, concurrent enrollment in ARC 4030 SDT 4112 Green Sites Technical Survey (3) fall

This modularized course introduces students to issues related to environmentally responsible site design:

site assessment; landscaping and aesthetic considerations; nutrient management and agricultural potential;

and mapping, water, utility, and permitting issues. This survey course also introduces students to the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). LEED and other best practice standards will be discussed; 2 hours of lecture, 2 hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: None SDT 4113 Green Buildings Technical Survey (3) spring This course introduces all SDT students to the technical issues related to Green Buildings and teaches students to act as a knowledgeable member of a multi-disciplinary team. By comparing sustainable design approaches to standard practice, the student learns about energy conservation in buildings. Topics covered include energy use in buildings; sustainable options; residential versus commercial construction; building energy modeling; economics of sustainable buildings; state and national regulations; voluntary standards such as LEED; professional and ethical responsibilities; and designing with a holistic team approach; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: SDT 3111 and 4112

Course Descriptions

SDT 4122 Sustainable Design Studio II (3) spring This capstone project course will serve to bring multi-disciplinary student teams together to solve a real life problem that integrates the knowledge of all the SDT tracks. Working with a client and experts in the field, each team will develop and present their concepts for a sustainable solution. This course requires that students draw upon solid knowledge of the SDT core, as well as the technical courses in their own concentration. The final solutions will be presented to the class and a panel of professionals. 6 hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: SDT 3121 SDT 4801/4802 Summer Internship/Internship Review (0/1) summer/fall Students enroll in the internship upon successful completion of their junior year core curriculum. The internship requires students to spend at least 5 weeks in an employment setting with an institution or firm that is employing, or seeks to employ, sustainable technology. This practicum is designed to broaden a student’s understanding of how sustainable technologies are implemented in the real world. Students will be enrolled in the 1 credit internship review in the following fall term; graded Pass/No Pass.

Social Science (SSC) SSC 2010 Science, Technology, and Society (3) as required This course explores the ways that science and technology are related to the broader social context of human civilization. Case studies illustrate the social and environmental impacts of science and technology, as well as the ways that social structures influence the development of science and technology. Guest lecturers discuss the responsibility of the individual technician. Students give oral presentations and engage in class debates; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None SSC 2030 Energy and Society (3) as required This course is designed to enable students to gain insights into the energy issue and to promote energy awareness and conservation. Topics will include a history of energy use; forms of energy; energy resources;

renewable sources; the economics of energy production and consumption; and relevant social issues regarding energy. Appropriate field trips and guest lectures are scheduled; 3 hours of lecture per week.

(General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None SSC 3010 Revolution and the Call to Serve (3) as required This course explores the concepts of community, service, and honor through rigorous study of current cultural events and trends; literature (political, religious, and aesthetic); and each student’s own ethics and values. The course begins with an overview of historical definitions of service in our country and in other cultures so that students are better able to understand their opinions and actions within a historical and global context. Most importantly, a major segment of this course involves direct service, providing students with ongoing hands-on experience for reflection and analysis along with their reading, writing, research, and classroom discussion; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent SSC 3045 News and Newspapers (3) on-line This course explores the nature of news: what is news, who controls news, how news is presented, and the many ways that news and newspapers affect our daily lives. Emphasis is placed on how news can contribute to being an informed citizen as well as how news can be manipulated to influence public opinion and policy.

The course is offered on-line. Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent

Course Descriptions

Individual Research (XXX) XXX X710 Special Topics as required These courses are for one-time or special offerings that do not have an approved course number. They may be in any subject area and the credits may vary. The special topics course requirements and evaluation criteria are developed by the instructor and are subject to departmental approval. Details of specific course content are available from the instructor of from the department chair for the subject offered.

XXX X910 Individual Research/Study as required These courses are subjects on course material that do not have an approved course number. They may vary in subject area and the credits may vary. These courses are for individual research. The research project must

be related to the student’s major field of study or another area approved for independent study. Prerequisite:

Departmental and Academic Dean’s permission Telecommunications (TCT) TCT 1000 Telecommunications Orientation (1) fall This course is an orientation to the college experience including an analysis and discussion of learning styles, time management, test-taking, and study skills. 1 hour of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None TCT 1001 Telecommunications I (4) fall This course is an introduction to the techniques, principles, and terminology of voice telecommunications.

Public and private telecommunication networks will be examined. Telecommunication equipment, switching, and transmission technology will be demonstrated. The frequency spectrum, modulation schemes, and multiplexing techniques will be explored. Lectures, interactive learning, and demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: None TCT 1002 Telecommunications II: Introduction to Voice & Data (4) spring An introduction to the techniques, principles, and terminology of data communications will be presented.

Public and private networks will be examined. Data communication equipment, multiplexing, and interactive learning demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: TCT 1001 TCT 2003 Telecommunications III: LANS and WANS (4) fall This course is designed to train students in the organization, architecture, setup, maintenance, hardware, and software aspects of computer networks. Topics include an introduction to networks; types and characteristics of different network architectures (LAN to WAN); network topologies and cabling; intraand inter-network devices; network operating systems; peer-to-peer and client/server environments; LAN setup and maintenance; inter-network communications, including connecting a LAN to the Internet; remote network access; network printing; network security; and world wide web servers. A hands-on approach will

be taken, with team projects throughout; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:

TCT 1002 TCT 2004 Telecommunications IV: Advanced Topics (4) spring A survey of current and emerging technologies in Telecommunications will be presented. Lectures, interactive learning, demonstrations, and site visits will be employed; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: TCT-2003 Course Descriptions Technical Education (TEC) TEC 1110 Issues and Trends in Technical Education (3) summer This course is designed to provide in-depth coverage of current issues in technical education with a historical perspective on the development of programs in Vermont; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None TEC 1120 Reading in Technical Education Content Areas (3) summer This course is designed to assist technical center teachers in the development of techniques that will allow them to teach basic reading skills as an integrated part of their technical classroom. The primary focus will be on teaching skills for “reading to learn” about subject content. Technical center classrooms by nature are a process-centered mode. Students learn in ways that allow direct application to technical job requirements.

This course emphasizes the same process-centered approach for the teaching of reading skills; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None TEC 1130 Vocational Instruction for Students w/Special Needs (3) summer This three credit course is designed to inform technical educators about students who are members of special populations, including methods of identification, assessment, modifications, and accommodations provided to these individuals and the role of the technical educator in these processes; 3 hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite: None Theatre Arts (THA) THA 2070 Comedy in Film (3) as required This course focuses on the psychological, social, and dramatic roots of comedy, as well as reviewing the social context of American comedy. Students will study paired films from different time periods, all of which use elements of comic structure, characterization, plot, symbolism, and themes; 2 hours of lecture, 2 hours of laboratory per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent Veterinary (VET) VET 1000 Freshman Orientation (1) fall This course introduces students to the wide range of employment opportunities for the veterinary technician.

Presentations by guest lecturers are included. Information on using the library, Learning Center, and other support facilities on campus are provided. Students are introduced to different study skills and problemsolving techniques; 1 hour of lecture per week; graded: Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: None

–  –  –

VET 1030 Animal Care and Restraint (3) fall This course teaches the principles of animal management which are fundamental to animal health. The student is introduced to the basics of animal behavior; handling; and restraint; feeding; housing; and disease prevention. Laboratories stress hands-on experience with the handling, restraint, physical exam, and administration of medications to common domestic species and to laboratory animals. Proficiency in

performance of laboratory tasks is evaluated; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:

None VET 1040 Animal Diseases (4) spring Bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases are discussed with a review of disease prevention practices.

Laboratories concentrate on diagnostic techniques including microbiology; fungal cultures and evaluations;

parasitologic specimen collection and processing; necropsy procedures; specimen handling; and shipping specimens to other laboratories; 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: VET 1010 and 1030, BIO 2320 VET 1051 Animal Care I (1) fall This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in the daily care and maintenance of farm, laboratory, and pet animals. Students are assigned times to care for the colony dogs, cats, laboratory animals, birds, sheep, horses, and dairy animals under supervision. This course is repeatable for credit; selected hours throughout the term; graded Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: None VET 1052 Animal Care II (1) spring This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in the daily care and maintenance of farm, laboratory, and pet animals. Students are assigned times to care for the colony dogs, cats, laboratory animals, birds, sheep, horses, and dairy animals under supervision. This course is repeatable for credit; scheduled hours throughout the term; graded Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: VET 1051 or instructor permission VET 1060 Laboratory Techniques (5) spring Students learn to perform venipunctures, complete blood counts, urinalyses, serum chemistries, and supplemental hematologic evaluations on all species studied in VET 1030. Proficiency in performing tasks in the laboratories is emphasized; 3 hours of lecture, 4 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: VET 1030, BIO 2320 VET 2011 Veterinary Clinical Techniques I (3) fall Students learn the stages of anesthesia and how to induce and monitor anesthesia under the direct supervision of a veterinarian. Surgical nursing skills associated with aseptic technique and proper protocols in the surgery suite are covered. Pre- and post-op monitoring, record keeping, and client education skills are practiced. Students perform blood work, urinalysis, and fecal examination on animals that are scheduled

to be anesthetized as medically indicated; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:

VET 1030, 1020, 1040, and 1060 VET 2012 Veterinary Clinical Techniques II (3) spring This course provides instruction in radiography of both large and small animals. The laboratories review anesthesia while the students learn to position animals for radiographs and develop, handle, and store the films. Ancillary techniques such as dentistry procedures are also covered. Students perform blood work, urinalysis, and fecal examination on animals that are scheduled to be anesthetized as medically indicated; 2 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: VET 2011, 2050, and 2070

Course Descriptions

VET 2030 Animal Nutrition (2) fall This course familiarizes the student with various nutrients and their metabolism. Diet formulation for common domestic and laboratory animals is covered, including species variation in nutritional requirements.

The use of prescription diets for small animals is discussed. Practical information regarding client education for feeding both large and small animals is presented; 2 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CHE 1020, BIO 2320, and VET 1020 VET 2040 Reproduction and Genetics (3) spring This course provides instruction in genetics and comparative reproductive physiology of domesticated animals. Reproductive management is covered, including heat detection; determination of pregnancy;

management of pregnant animals and parturition; and reproductive failure. Students gain information on how to assist veterinarians with reproductive and obstetrical procedures; 3 hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite: BIO 2320 and VET 1020 and 2070 VET 2050 Applied Laboratory Methods (4) fall Students learn medical nursing skills including bandaging, responding to medical emergencies, performing CPR, handling trauma cases, preparing animals for certain diagnostic procedures, obtaining an EKG, completing blood transfusions, and offering fluid therapy. Cytological specimens are collected and evaluated; 3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: VET 1020, 1040, and 1060 VET 2060 Veterinary Office Procedures (3) spring Students review material on professionalism and interactions with clients that they have been introduced to in other courses. This course then provides additional information on interpersonal communication, professional correspondence, legal issues regarding medical records, organizing an office, financial record keeping, and OSHA compliance. Practical information on evaluating a potential job position and getting and keeping a job is presented; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in VET program or instructor permission VET 2070 Pharmacology and Toxicology (3) fall Calculation of drug doses, dispensing, and administration of medications are reviewed. The metabolism of commonly-used veterinary medications and their beneficial and potential harmful effects on the body are covered. Students become familiar with common poisonous substances and plants and gain information on assisting the veterinarian in treating toxicity cases; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: VET 1020, 1040, and 1060 and CHE 1020 VET 2080 Animal Behavior (2) spring This course is designed to give veterinary technology students grounding in the natural behaviors of the common domestic species. Included are the neural, genetic, and endocrine bases for these behaviors. In addition, many aspects of clinical behavioral medicine also are covered. Included are patient history-taking;

reviews of common behavioral problems of dogs and cats; patient evaluation; behavior modification; and drug therapy; 2 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in VET program or instructor permission VET 2090 Veterinary Technician National Exam Seminar (1) spring This course is a comprehensive review of the core curriculum material presented in the first three semesters of the veterinary technician program. The purpose is to prepare students for standardized professional examinations, such as the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE); 1 hour of seminar each week;

graded Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: VET 2030, 2050, 2070, and 2011.

–  –  –

VET 2801/2802 Summer Externship/Externship Review (0/1) summer/fall Students are enrolled in the externship after successful completion of the first-year core curriculum. The externship consists of a summer practicum of a minimum of 300 hours. Students may attend one or more sites in order to gain the appropriate experience(s). Successful completion of the externship is required for graduation. After successful completion of the summer externship, students are enrolled in the externship

review seminar in the subsequent and fall term. The review is a letter-graded one credit course. Prerequisite:

Sophomore standing Vermont Tech People Vermont Tech People Vermont State Colleges Board of Trustees Governor, State of Vermont (Ex Officio) James Douglas

March 1, 2007-February 28, 2013 (6-Year Term) Heidi Pelletier

Peter Wright

Gordon Winters

March 1, 2006-February 28, 2010 (4-Year Term) Rep. William Aswad

Sen. Richard Marron, Vice Chair

March 1, 2005-February 28, 2011 (6-Year Term) Karen Luneau

Frank A. Mazza, Sr., Secretary

Martha A. O’Connor, Treasurer

March 1, 2008-February 28, 2012 (4-Year Term) Rep. Greg Clark

Rep. Peter Peltz

March 1, 2009-February 28, 2013 (6-Year Term) Michelle Fairbrother

Linda Milne

Gary M. Moore, Chair

July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010 (Student Trustee) Kelsi Powers

–  –  –

Full-time Faculty Rachel E. Repstad (2005) Scott A. Sabol, PE (1999) Assistant Professor: Mathematics Professor & Chair: Architectural & Building BS, Johnson State College BA, BE, Dartmouth College MS, University of Vermont MS, Pennsylvania State University

–  –  –

Kenneth J. Vandermark (1985) Professor: Electrical & Computer BS, Clarkson College of Technology MS, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Richard R. Warren (1997) Professor: Electrical & Computer BS, Norwich University MEng, Cornell University Staff

–  –  –

Terrence Reynolds Douglas Peters Control Technologies, Inc. Applied Research Associates, Inc.

South Burlington, Vermont South Royalton, VT

–  –  –

Robin Rice, RN ’06 – ‘07 Stephen Quennville ‘82 Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital Applied Research Associates Lebanon, New Hampshire South Royalton, Vermont

–  –  –

Agriculture Courses

Appeal of Dismissal

Application Deadlines

Architecture Courses.................. 151-155 Career/Transfer Center

Architectural & Building Challenge Exams

Engineering Technology.......... 19, 58-60

–  –  –

Changing Programs/Majors.................33 D Chemistry Courses

Technology

Civil & Environmental Engineering Courses.................. 162-164 Dental Hygiene

–  –  –

Nursing

Nursing Courses

–  –  –

Textbooks and Supplies

Three-Year Options

Time Limitation on Graduation Requirements

Transcripts



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