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«Vermont Technical College Catalog 2009-2010 Bachelor of Science Architectural Engineering Technology Business Technology and Management Computer ...»

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None History (HIS) HIS 1111 World History I (3) as required This course serves as an introduction to world civilizations: Ancient, Mediterranean, European, South Asian, East Asian, and African. Study includes origins of the time of global expansion of European civilizations; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HIS 1112 World History II (3) as required This course serves as an introduction to world civilizations from 1500 through the present: European, Asian, African, and American. Study includes origins of the time of global expansion of European civilizations and the modern evolution of world powers and world problems; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HIS 1211 American History I (3) fall In the course, students survey major historical events as they affected the lives of the American people.

Emphasis in the course is placed on the changes in institutions, values, and lifestyles that characterized the evolution of our society from a colonial, agrarian culture to that of a unified, democratic republic; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HIS 1212 American History II (3) spring Students examine the historical roots of American society as an individualized, urbanized, technological culture and consider the problems and solutions generated by such a culture. Students also study the evolution of the US in foreign affairs to its present status as a superpower; 3 hours of lecture per week.

(General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None

Course Descriptions

HIS 1260 Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future (3) fall This course covers the history of computing from early mechanical devices; theoretical milestones;

electronic computers of the late 1940s and 1950s; generational changes in architecture; underlying technologies; the progression from main frames to minicomputers, supercomputers, microcomputers, and embedded computers; and networking. Introductory societal and/or ethical issues, such as the digital divide, encryption, peer-to-peer file sharing, and computers and homeland security are also covered. Further focus is placed on organizational and human forces shaping the adoption of information technology and the difficulties that may be experienced during a systems implementation, a change of systems, and the impacts of computer technology on employment, health, and the community. It concludes with various trends and forces shaping information technology and probable changes that will occur from a futurist perspective.

Topics include recent new technologies and their effect on people and society; basic concepts of future studies; and the application of future studies to make a prediction regarding new technologies; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS [for non-computer majors]) Prerequisite: None

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HIS 2150 History of the US in the Sixties (3) as required This course explores the movements and events of the US during one of the most tumultuous decades of our history: the 1960s. Through documentary films and other media, readings, websites, and discussion, students will study such topics as the civil rights movement, the Kennedy administration and assassination, the student movement, the impact of the Vietnam War, and the music, art, and literature of the counterculture that are the hallmarks of a decade marked by social activism and political and cultural upheaval. Through individual and group reading, study, and presentation, students will learn of the continuation of the environmental, women’s, and civil rights movements. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HIS 2270 Society and Environment in History (3) as required This course provides an exploration of the response to environmental challenges by various societies in history and why societies fail and perish or succeed and survive. The course will consider social and cultural adaptation to environmental conditions and challenges and will analyze the relationship and interaction between society and environment in the development of sustainable communities. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HIS 2660 European Classroom (3) fall This course will immerse students in the art, history, and architecture of a foreign city through participation in intensive coursework combined with the experience of a guided travel tour to Europe. The course will use visual perception and critical analysis to study the interconnected fields while expanding student learning by facilitating experience of works of art and architecture first hand. It will reinforce each student’s understanding of topics in the history, culture, art, and architecture of the target city. This is a cultural experience intended to enrich and broaden student perspectives in our increasingly global world; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 and instructor permission HIS 3165 Vermont History and Government (3) as required This course provides a close look at Vermont’s historical, social, and economic development, its problems as a republic, the struggle for statehood, and its constitution and government today. The instruction observes Vermont’s place in American civilization from its inventive, cultural, educational, literary, and political contributions; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: None





Course Descriptions

Humanities (HUM)

ANT 1010 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) as required

This course is a survey of basic issues, concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Students think critically about the evolution of culture and society from the perspective of the past and the present.

Topics include social and political organization, gender, myth, religion, language, cultural ecology, and cultural exchange; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: SS) Prerequisite: None HUM 2020 Bioethics (3) as required This course provides an exploration of ethical issues from beginning-of-life to end-of-life, from legal, medical, and philosophical perspectives. Topics include assisted reproduction, abortion, euthanasia, genetic experimentation and cloning, and homosexuality; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: None

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HUM 2070 The Vampire in Literature (3) as required The image of the vampire has long held sway with popular imagination. Since the publication of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” in 1897, the vampire has become a staple of popular culture, appearing in literature, advertisements, cartoons, music, television shows, and film. This course examines the role of the vampire in literature, culture, and film. Through the reading of texts and the viewing of films, students will understand the fundamental aspects of Gothic literature and formulate their own ideas as to the importance of the vampire archetype. In addition, students will learn to identify vampirical elements in literature and film and will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the vampire’s role in popular culture; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent HUM 2080 The Literature and Culture of Witchcraft (3) as required Grounded in the early European historical context of Witchcraft and the Colonial American experience of Witchcraft, this course engages students in an exploratory and critical dialog that examines Witchcraft as it is represented in various types of literature (including plays, short stories, poetry, court documents, journal entries, and novels), culture, and film. Witchcraft stereotypes and hysteria often represent the societal anxieties and beliefs of the culture in which they appear and offer a rich subject for academic study. By drawing from the readings and films assigned throughout the semester, as well as personal research and reflective and critical analysis, students will develop their own unique discourse in regards to the literature and culture of witchcraft and its unique contribution to contemporary and past culture; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent

Course Descriptions

HUM 2330 Peace Studies (3) as required This course introduces students to the ideas, principles, and practices of peacemaking. We will examine the literature and philosophy of peace and nonviolence in the context of historical experience and learn practical ways of peacemaking that we can apply to our own lives. We’ll watch films, hear speakers, read, discuss, and take a field trip to the Green Mountain Dharma Center. Grades are based on attendance and participation;

weekly short informal writing assignments; midterm and final take-home essay exams; and a final research paper/project and presentation; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: None HUM 2350 Mindfulness, Meditation, Stress Reduction (3) as required This course introduces students to the principles and practices of mindfulness, meditation, and mindfulnessbased stress reduction. We will examine the literature and philosophy of mindfulness and practice meditation and stress-reduction techniques. We’ll hear speakers, read, watch films, discuss, and practice; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or equivalent HUM 2660 European Classroom (3) as required This course will immerse students in the literature, art, and architecture of a foreign city through participation in intensive coursework combined with a guided travel tour to Europe. The course will use visual perception and critical analysis to study the interconnected fields while expanding student learning by experiencing the works of art and architecture first hand. It will reinforce each student’s understanding of topics in the history, culture, art, and architecture of the country being studied. This is a cultural experience intended to enrich and broaden student perspectives in our increasingly global world. Prerequisite: ENG 1061 and instructor permission HUM 3050 Theories of Science and Technology (3) as required This course explores a variety of historical and philosophical perspectives on science and technology.

Special emphasis is placed on the relationships of science, technology, social and political structures, and individual responsibility. Topics include the nature of science and technology; elitism in science and technology; goals and control; and the role of the individual scientist or technician; 3 hours lecture per week.

(General Education: AH) Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission HUM 3070 The Vampire in Literature--Upper Level (3) as required The image of the vampire has long held sway with popular imagination. Since the publication of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” in 1897, the vampire has become a staple of popular culture, appearing in literature, advertisements, cartoons, music, television shows, and film. This course examines the role of the vampire in literature, culture, and film. Through the reading of texts and the viewing of films, students will understand the fundamental aspects of Gothic literature and formulate their own ideas as to the importance of the vampire archetype. In addition, students will learn to identify vampirical elements in literature and film and will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the vampire’s role in popular culture; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education: AH) Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission HUM 3330 Peace Studies and Peacemaking (3) as required This course studies the ideas, principles and practices of peacemaking in depth. It will examine the literature and philosophy of peace, pacificism, and nonviolence in the context of historical experience and teach practical ways of peacemaking through mindfulness, nonviolent communication, and nonviolent conflict resolution; 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: ENG 1061 or instructor permission HUM 3490 Crime and Punishment in Film and Literature (3) as required This course introduces students to the fundamental legal and ethical issues in American crime and criminal justice through film and literature. The course examines the dilemmas in crime and punishment. Students

discuss literature and films in the context of the humanities; 3 hours of lecture per week. (General Education:

AH) Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission Course Descriptions Interdisciplinary (INT) INT 0010 Effective Learning (0) fall/spring This course will introduce students to the behaviors and skills necessary for academic success. Through a series of readings, journals, lectures, and essays, students will develop skills in setting goals; developing a sense of personal ownership and responsibility, and self-awareness, along with the more mechanical skills of note-taking and organization. Particularly appropriate for students on academic probation, the learning acquired will enable them to achieve and maintain good academic standing; 1 hours of lecture per week;

graded Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: None INT 1000 Freshman Orientation (1) as required This course is designed to facilitate a successful transition to college and focuses on orientation to college, academic success strategies, professional development, and an introduction to a degree program. Topics include student rights and responsibilities; student grading and graduation requirements; student information technologies and data base orientation; campus/site resources; time management; note taking; introduction to career opportunities; and program specific topics; 1 hour of seminar per week; graded Pass/No Pass.

Prerequisite: None Landscape (LAH) LAH 1000 Freshman Orientation (1) fall

This course is designed to facilitate a successful transition to college and focuses on four primary areas:

orientation to the college, academic success strategies, professional development, and introduction to program-specific careers. Topics include student rights and responsibilities; campus resources; time management; note taking; test taking, learning styles and study skills; self esteem, group dynamics and stress management; and an introduction to career opportunities; 1 hour of seminar per week; graded Pass/ No Pass. Prerequisite: None

LAH 1020 Introduction to Horticulture (3) fall



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