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«EDUCATIONAL POLICIES COMMITTEE MINUTES 12 January 2012 A meeting of the Educational Policies Committee was held on 12 January 2012 at 3 p.m. in Old ...»

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Utah Valley University A.A.S. in Hospitality Management A.S. Pre-Major in Hospitality Management B.S. in Business Management, Emphasis in Hospitality Management B.S. in Hospitality Management B.A./B.S. in Integrated Studies, Emphasis in Hospitality Management The degree programs focus primarily on hospitality and business with less emphasis on tourism. As such, the programs are not directly related to the proposed minor. The major degree programs have one course in tourism.

There is no identified minor. The A.S. and A.A.S. Degrees require 65 and 60 credit hours respectively and do not require a course in tourism.

The coursework for the bachelor degree programs are as follows:

B.S. in Business Management, Emphasis in Hospitality Management: HM3200 - Global Tourism; HM3020 Hospitality Management Accounting; HM3390 - Hotel Operations II; HM3640 - Food and Beverage Controls B.S. in Hospitality Management: HM1010 - Introduction to Hospitality Industry; HM1110 - Food Production Principles; HM1130 - Hotel Operations 1; HM1180 - Food and Beverage Management; HM282R Cooperative Work Experience; HM3020 - Hospitality Management Accounting; HM3250 - Hospitality Finance; HM3390 - Hotel Operations II; HM3640 - Food and Beverage Controls; HM3710 - Marketing of Hospitality Services; HM4550 - Hospitality Industry Management; LEGL3100 - Hospitality Law; Plus electives in tracks for Hotel and Restaurant Management (HM1110 - Food Production Principles plus 6 credit hours of unspecified electives and 4 credit hours of general education) or Food and Beverage (CA1120 - Cooking Skills Development ; CA1170 - Non-Business Elective for 8 credits; CA481R Cooperative Work Experience) B.A./B.S. Integrated Studies, Emphasis in Hospitality Management: HM1130 - Hotel Operations 1; HM3390

- Hotel Operations II plus 4 classes from the following: HM3020 - Hospitality Managerial Accounting;

HM3050 - Country Club Management; HM3150 - Hospitality Finance; HM3200 - Global Tourism; HM3640 Food and Beverage Controls; HM3710 - Marketing of Hospitality Services; HM4550 - Hospitality Industry Management; LEGL3100 - Hospitality Law Dixie State College of Utah

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This program is only tangentially related to hospitality and tourism Southern Utah University B.S. in Hotel, Resort and Hospitality Management B.S. in Outdoor Recreation in Parks and Tourism The B.S. degree program in Hotel, Resort, and Hospitality Management is administered through the School of Business and is weighted toward hospitality and business. One course is offered in tourism. In the minor, no course in tourism is required.

The coursework for the B.S. in Hotel, Resort, and Hospitality Management include: HRHM3010 - Tourism Management; HRHM3020 - Hospitality Sanitation & Safety Management; HRHM3110 - Quantity Food Production; HRHM3300 - Real Property Management; HRHM3400 - Hotel Room Operations; HRHM3510 Intro. to Hospitality Finance; HRHM4200 - Restaurant Management; HRHM4400 - Hospitality Management Systems; HRHM4500 - Hospitality Work Requirement; HRHM4600 - Strategic Leadership in HRHM;

HRHM4601 - Strategic Guest Service.

For the B.S. degree in Outdoor Recreation in Parks and Tourism, one course is offered in tourism (i.e., ORPT 1000 Intro to Outdoor Recreation Tourism and Tourism).

Westminster College, Salt Lake City

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These programs are only tangentially related to hospitality and tourism.

Snow College Associate of Applied Science in Culinary Arts This program represents a specialized aspect of hospitality.

Brigham Young University

–  –  –

These programs are only tangentially related to hospitality, tourism, and business.

Salt Lake Community College Associate of Applied Science Degree in Aviation Technology Associate of Science Degree in Professional Pilot Associate of Applied Science in Apprenticeship These programs are only tangentially related to hospitality, tourism, and business.

Department of Management, Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, Proposed Minor in Hospitality and Tourism Management The proposed requirements for a minor in Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) include four courses totaling 12 credit hours.

The first course is designed to be broad and focuses on the general principles of marketing strategy as it relates to both the hospitality and tourism sectors of the economy with special emphasis on the Intermountain Region and the State of Utah. It provides a foundation for understanding how to market and how to manage the wide array of opportunities and challenges within these sectors including: lodging, theme parks, special events, conventions, convention and visitors bureaus, offices of tourism (as well as other destination management organizations). The three other courses are more specific to lodging/resort operations: (1) revenue/cost management principles, (2) hospitality management, and (3) tourism and event management. Inherent in each of these courses is the interrelationship between hospitality and tourism. Each course also incorporates the general job competencies expected of entry level hospitality and/or tourism management positions.

It is expected that the coursework will also reflect not only well-established principles of sound management practice but emerging trends in the administration of hospitality and tourism services. As such, for each of the course descriptions, research articles that address important issues in HTM are included to provide analytical knowledge that is essential for effective decision making. The content of these, and other articles, should be considered in the execution of each course in order to ensure that the knowledge being transferred to students is both relevant and timely (i.e., state-of-the-art). In this way, the program can provide a competitive advantage vis-à-vis alternative programs that provide mainly foundation knowledge (i.e., textbook instruction). Finally, the proposed curriculum reflects the principles of an executive education program (i.e., customized to Utah and the Intermountain Region) at the undergraduate level. As such, it is consistent with the concept of professional development.





Course descriptions for all of the courses included in the proposed minor, justification for those courses, and

prerequisites are as follows:

MGT 3900: Strategic Marketing in Hospitality and Tourism

Course Description:

This course describes the nature and scope of career opportunities in hospitality and tourism. It provides an introduction to the language of hospitality and tourism management, describes how to identify, understand, and segment target audiences and discusses role of customer relationship management in hospitality and tourism management. Students also learn how to design and implement effective marketing communications, use market research in hospitality and tourism management, and review and evaluate best practices in the hospitality industry.

Course Justification:

This is the first course in the proposed minor for hospitality and tourism. It provides the foundational knowledge that students are expected to know; that is, the basic language, ideas, and concepts of the hospitality and tourism industry and the marketing and management competencies therein. In short, this is a survey course upon which higher level learning and application can be applied. There is a major stream of research and theory that will be applied to this course from the economic, marketing, management, and strategy literatures.

MGT 3910: Revenue and Cost Management in Hospitality and Tourism

Course Description:

This course provides a foundation for managing revenues and costs in the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will learn how to analyze financial statements in the industry and how to effectively use them in strategic/tactical decision-making. Strategies for optimizing sustainable profitability will be explored. The course will rely upon simulations, role-play, and cases to analyze trends and develop effective revenue management strategies.

Course Justification:

This course is fundamental to those working in the hospitality and tourism industry. Employers expect graduates from programs of study focusing on hospitality and tourism to have a firm understanding of the theory, models, and concepts related to cost management and revenue specific to that industry. The course will rely upon a very strong stream of research that examines these issues. Students with a clear understanding of consumer motivations, lifestyles, and benefits and how they drive costs and revenues will be attractive to future employers.

Pre-requisite: MGT 3900

MGT 3920: Hospitality Management and Operations

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of the logistics and operations of the tourism and hospitality industry including:

lodging management practices, special event planning, food and beverage, housekeeping, etc. The day-to-day decisions that are a part of the tactical side of the tourism and lodging industry will be taught. Special topics such as service recovery, impression management, and the use of social media will be examined. Finally, human resource management within the industry will be considered including recruiting and retaining a high quality workforce.

Course Justification:

Employees in the tourism and hospitality industry must be able to effectively execute tactics and strategies in order to help ensure market success. To help accomplish this objective, they must have foundational knowledge and the capability to effectively and efficiently manage the operations of an organization in the industry. This course must be a part of the core courses required for the minor in Hospitality and Tourism Management. Without a strong foundation in hospitality management and operations concepts, graduates will not be attractive candidates for employment in the industry.

Pre-requisite: MGT 3900

MGT 3930: Tourism and Event Management

Course Description:

Core revenue drivers in the Tourism and Hospitality industry are special events, meetings, conferences, conventions, festivals, guided tours, and tradeshows. This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the role that each plays in hospitality and tourism as well as the management principles needed to be an effective administrator. The course also provides students with the service skills that are considered essential to managing different types of customers with very different motivations and needs.

Course Justification:

Recent research has found that meetings and special events coursework is a critical part of a Tourism and Hospitality program of study (Cecil, Reed and Reed, 2011). Graduates from the USU Hospitality and Tourism Management Minor who can help an organization or region build its revenue through special events planning and execution will be very marketable. This course is a logical capstone course for the minor after students have had the survey course and learned the operations, marketing, management, and finance of the industry. This course will give our students a differentiated advantage in the job-market.

Pre-requisite: MGT 3900, MGT 3910, MGT 3920

The job competencies that will be developed with this minor include:

1. Knowledge of the realities involved in the type of work found in the tourism and hospitality industry.

2. Knowledge of the basic terminology used in the lodging industry.

3. Knowledge of lodging management practices.

4. Knowledge of guest service standards.

5. Knowledge of hospitality products and services.

Section III: Institutional Impact The Hospitality and Tourism Management Minor will reside within the Management Department of the Jon M.

Huntsman School of Business. Professor Ken Bartkus will manage the minor under the direction of James H. Davis, Head of the Management Department. Professor Bartkus performs research and has established a national reputation for his research and academic thought leadership in the hospitality and tourism industry. A newly hired instructor will broadcast three of the four courses from the Moab Regional Education Center and throughout all RCDEs and to on-campus students at Utah State University. The final capstone course for the minor will be taught by Professor Bartkus and broadcast throughout the state.

Existing distance learning technology will be used to broadcast the minor statewide.

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Funding for the Hospitality and Tourism Management Minor will come from the RCDE Program. The cost for delivery of the program will be labor. We already have the technology, infrastructure, and structure to deliver the program.

Source of Funding: RCDE

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The Department of Environment and Society, in the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University, requests discontinuation of the PhD in Recreation Resource Management. This request is intended to eliminate redundancy in our graduate programs.

The field of Recreation Resource Management combines elements of the social and natural sciences to explore topics related to the management of parks, protected areas, and other natural settings in a way that offers visitors opportunities for desired outdoor experiences while protecting the land for future generations and other uses. Students interested in studying these topics may do so within a more broadly focused doctoral program, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Science and Management. Therefore we propose to eliminate the more specialized but less popular PhD in Recreation Resource Management. We do not plan to discontinue our graduate courses in this subject, nor will any faculty be reassigned. We would retain the bachelor of science and master of science degrees in this subject.

Section II: Need



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